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Old 03-22-2016, 06:05 AM  
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Those were the days -

Those were the days -

Heavens to Murgatroyd! Would you believe the email spell checker did not recognize the word murgatroyd?

Lost Words from our childhood:

Words gone as fast as the buggy whip! Sad, really! The other day a not so elderly (65) lady said something to her son about driving a Jalopy and he looked at her quizzically and said what the heck is a Jalopy? OMG (new phrase!) he never heard of the word jalopy!!

She knew she was old but not that old...Well, I hope you are Hunky Dory after you read this, and chuckle...by Richard Lederer

About a month ago, I illuminated some old expressions that have become obsolete because of the inexorable march of technology. These phrases included: "Don't touch that dial”, "Carbon copy", "You sound like a broken record" and "Hung out to dry."

Back in the olden days we had a lot of moxie. We'd put on our best bib and tucker to straighten up and fly right Heavens to Betsy! Gee whillikers! Jumping Jehoshaphat! Holy moley!

We were in like Flynn and living the life of Riley, and even a regular guy couldn't accuse us of being a knucklehead, a nincompoop or a pill. Not for all the tea in China!

Back in the olden days, life used to be swell, but when's the last time anything was swell?

Swell has gone the way of beehives, pageboys and the D.A.; of spats, knickers, fedoras, poodle skirts, saddle shoes and pedal pushers.

Oh, my aching back. Kilroy was here, but he isn't anymore.

We wake up from what surely has been just a short nap, and before we can say, “well I'll be a monkey's uncle!” or “This is a fine kettle of fish!” We discover that the words we grew up with,- the words that seemed omnipresent as oxygen, have vanished with scarcely a notice from our tongues and our pens and our keyboards.

Poof, go the words of our youth, the words we've left behind. We blink, and they're gone. Where have all those phrases gone?

Long gone: Pshaw, The milkman did it.

Hey! It's your nickel.

Don't forget to pull the chain. Knee high to a grasshopper.

Well, Fiddlesticks! Going like sixty. I'll see you in the funny papers. Don't take any wooden nickels. Heavens to Murgatroyd!

It turns out there are more of these lost words and expressions than Carter has liver pills.

This can be disturbing stuff!

We of a certain age have been blessed to live in changeful times. For a child each new word is like a shiny toy, a toy that has no age. We at the other end of the chronological arc have the advantage of remembering there are words that once did not exist and there were words that once strutted their hour upon the earthly stage and now are heard no more, except in our collective memories. It's one of the greatest advantages of aging.

See ya later, alligator

"In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity." - A. Einstein

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Old 03-22-2016, 05:56 PM  
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I haven't heard some of those words and phrases since I was a young squirt, since Hector was a pup, seems like a coon's age.

"A pen in the hand of this president is far more dangerous than a gun in the hands of 200 million law-abiding citizens."
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Old 03-22-2016, 10:33 PM  

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These days, if something is awesome, kids say "Wow, that's sick" To which I think....HUH?

Well, I'm young (by comparison) but I can recall many of those quotes. But then my folks are going on 81 years old, just celebrated 60 years of marriage back in January, and perhaps some of that comes from them when I was growing up. Who knows.
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Old 03-24-2016, 08:20 PM  

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Speaking of which..... I often think about my folks generation and remember listening to 1940s tunes on our radio as a kid in our single room cabin that had no running water or electricity until 1983 (electricity) and 1996 (indoor plumbing)

I listen to NPR and on Friday evenings they spotlight a show called "Swinging down the lane" Hosted by David Miller, in which the show presents period music often with themes from the 1930 40s 50s and 60s. Good stuff! Here's a link to the shows home page and from there, you can see previous programs or stream them online.


Another show of similar ilk and, on NPR is Fascinatin' Rhythem


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