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Old 12-21-2011, 12:32 AM  
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Meet me at my house Alex. I'll give you the grand tour of them, from South to North. They are really great looking and worth the visit!
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Old 12-25-2011, 08:22 PM  
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Oh man, I tell you, this one is a hard question, I have several for several different reasons . . . .

One is actually an asistencia to San Luis Rey called San Antonio de Pala. It is today, as far as I know, the ONLY California mission doing what it was built for. Administery the Catholic faith to the indigenous people.

Another is San Gabriel near L.A.
San Luis Obispo (I have copies of a marriage cert from there)
Santa Barbara is one I was able to enter and see the actual books from the early days.
La Purisima
I love all the California missions, pueblos and presidios of early Alta California, they all have a special place in my heart.

(Does anybody know that there were also two missions on the Colorado River in California but were burnt down?)


Don't forget the settlers and military side of the Spanish Colonial period, (4 presidios, 4 pueblos), Jerrel Jackman is doing an exceptional job at reconstructing the Santa Barbara presidio from copies of the original drawings used to build it.
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Old 12-26-2011, 09:06 AM  
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Originally Posted by HiHood View Post
Oh man, I tell you, this one is a hard question, I have several for several different reasons . . . .

One is actually an asistencia to San Luis Rey called San Antonio de Pala. It is today, as far as I know, the ONLY California mission doing what it was built for. Administery the Catholic faith to the indigenous people.

Another is San Gabriel near L.A.
San Luis Obispo (I have copies of a marriage cert from there)
Santa Barbara is one I was able to enter and see the actual books from the early days.
La Purisima
I love all the California missions, pueblos and presidios of early Alta California, they all have a special place in my heart.

(Does anybody know that there were also two missions on the Colorado River in California but were burnt down?)


Don't forget the settlers and military side of the Spanish Colonial period, (4 presidios, 4 pueblos), Jerrel Jackman is doing an exceptional job at reconstructing the Santa Barbara presidio from copies of the original drawings used to build it.
Missions were built all over the America! St Augustine was originally a mission built by the Jesuits.

The two missions on the Colorado river were founded by Franciscans. After the military and civilians mistreated the local Indians, they rose up and killed everyone, including the friars that other Indians [disciples] had tried to hide. In fact, the friars stepped forward and pleaded with the Indians to put down their arms. Not only the friars were killed but so was Governor/Captain Rivera who had been with Father Serra on his original trek through Baja California and was one of the early governors of California.

Two California presidios still exist - Monte Rey and San Francisco. As indicated, someone is trying to reconstruct the one in Santa Barbara and the one in San Diego is completely surrounded by US Naval bases.

I too have always enjoyed San Gabriel as it was within a bike's ride from where I lived in the center of Los Angeles.

If you want another taste of California history, visit Olvera Street downtown near the train station. Some good food, great souvenirs, and the massive old tree in the plaza which the church [not mission] faces dates from Spanish times.

Enjoy!
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Old 12-26-2011, 10:59 AM  
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The two presidios at San Francisco and Monterey don't actually have the original buildings. Presidio hill in San Diego (above "Old Town") has but a couple signs and humps in the grass but the Serra Museum there has a lot to offer.
The "California Pepper Tree" that I always loved was actually imported from South America by the friars. The oldest one in CA presently is at Mission San Luis Rey de Francia in Oceanside.

There are several ranchos and homes left. As is known, less than a handfull of the land grants were actually "Spanish land grants" (about 30 of the 800 or so)the majority were Mexican land grants. To see early California as it really was, I would recommend taking a trip with your hiking shoes out to the I-15 in Murrieta, then go west on Clinten Keith Rd to the Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Preserve. It has an old rancho house from la familia Murrieta there and the land surrounding it has indigenous plants and animals of So. California.
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Old 12-27-2011, 11:21 AM  
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The two presidios at San Francisco and Monterey don't actually have the original buildings. Presidio hill in San Diego (above "Old Town") has but a couple signs and humps in the grass but the Serra Museum there has a lot to offer.
The "California Pepper Tree" that I always loved was actually imported from South America by the friars. The oldest one in CA presently is at Mission San Luis Rey de Francia in Oceanside.

There are several ranchos and homes left. As is known, less than a handfull of the land grants were actually "Spanish land grants" (about 30 of the 800 or so)the majority were Mexican land grants. To see early California as it really was, I would recommend taking a trip with your hiking shoes out to the I-15 in Murrieta, then go west on Clinten Keith Rd to the Santa Rosa Plateau Ecological Preserve. It has an old rancho house from la familia Murrieta there and the land surrounding it has indigenous plants and animals of So. California.
Governor Fages gave land grants to soldiers who had completed their enlistments. The main ones he gave in 1784 were:

- San Pedro to [soldier] Juan Jose Dominguez 48,000 acres (194km2)San Pedro, Torrance, Redondo Beach, Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach, Lomita, Gardena, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson, Compton Los Angeles

- Los Nietos to [soldier] Manuel Nieto 167,000 acres (676 km2) Long Beach, Lakewood, Downey, Norwalk, Santa Fe Springs, Whittier, Fullerton, Huntington Beach, Seal Beach, Anaheim, Buena Park, Garden Grove, Artesia, Cerritos, Orange

San Rafael- to [soldier] Jos? Mar?a Verdugo 36,403 acres (147 km2) Atwater Village, Eagle Rock, Glassell Park, Glendale, Highland Park Los Angeles

There were, of course, many more before and after Mexico gained its independence from Spain. In most cases, they were either purchased by high-ranking Spaniards believing they would make them very rich - or, most commonly, to soldiers ending their enlistments and having served the crown well and loyally.

The arrival of the Americans created havoc with the entire system as they did their best to grab up as much land as they could - legally and otherwise.
And we won't even discuss what they did to the Indians!!!

My blog A Soldier's Tales @ http://lvcabbie.blogspot.com
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Old 12-28-2011, 03:24 PM  
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Originally Posted by lvcabbie View Post
Governor Fages gave land grants to soldiers who had completed their enlistments. The main ones he gave in 1784 were:

- San Pedro to [soldier] Juan Jose Dominguez 48,000 acres (194km2)San Pedro, Torrance, Redondo Beach, Hermosa Beach, Manhattan Beach, Lomita, Gardena, Harbor City, Wilmington, Carson, Compton Los Angeles

- Los Nietos to [soldier] Manuel Nieto 167,000 acres (676 km2) Long Beach, Lakewood, Downey, Norwalk, Santa Fe Springs, Whittier, Fullerton, Huntington Beach, Seal Beach, Anaheim, Buena Park, Garden Grove, Artesia, Cerritos, Orange

San Rafael- to [soldier] Jos? Mar?a Verdugo 36,403 acres (147 km2) Atwater Village, Eagle Rock, Glassell Park, Glendale, Highland Park Los Angeles

There were, of course, many more before and after Mexico gained its independence from Spain. In most cases, they were either purchased by high-ranking Spaniards believing they would make them very rich - or, most commonly, to soldiers ending their enlistments and having served the crown well and loyally.

The arrival of the Americans created havoc with the entire system as they did their best to grab up as much land as they could - legally and otherwise.
And we won't even discuss what they did to the Indians!!!

My blog A Soldier's Tales @ A Soldier's Stories

A classic tale is of Rancho Santa Margarita Y las Flores. Forster had a deed signed to him by Pico. Pico claimed that Forster had tricked him into signing it, (Pico did not speak, read English, only Spanish), gaining his trust by being his son in law. The Rancho was leased by the US Gov during WWII and converted into Camp Pendleton Marine Base. This was a Mexican grant. The two families feuded about this until the 1990's. O'neill was the last owner, a descendant of Forster & Pico. (see book "Rancho Santa Margarita Remembered")
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Old 01-03-2012, 02:31 PM  
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HiHood - I've gone through some of the references and it's a real headache!!!
One source says one thing - and another something different.
But, thanks as it's adding to my data base of material so the final product will be as accurate as possible - for writing something in the 21st century that occurred in the 18th!
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Old 01-04-2012, 08:24 PM  
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HiHood - I've gone through some of the references and it's a real headache!!!
One source says one thing - and another something different.
But, thanks as it's adding to my data base of material so the final product will be as accurate as possible - for writing something in the 21st century that occurred in the 18th!
AND add to the fact that much of my stuff comes from the libruary at SB Mission & Presidio and so is pretty much fading from memories as I get older.
I at one time had access to the Thomas W. Temple records but no longer do. (I found a mistake in that those)

I have written a couple of articles in the late 80's or early 90's for SHHAR (Society of Hispanic Historical and Ancestral Reasearch)
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Old 01-30-2012, 12:34 PM  
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A fictional review of Father Serra's Legacy.

These novels tell the story of the founding of the California missions through the eyes of two 18th century youths. Timothy Beadle is from Sussex and his father indentured him to a ship's captain where he becomes the cabin boy. Jaimenacho is a Mexican Indian who survives smallpox and is found by two Franciscan friars on their way to take over missions founded by Jesuits. His Spanish supervisors learn Jaime is a skillful artist in wood, creating life-like images for the chapel.

Waves from a rare cyclone take Timothy overboard and washes him up on the shore of Baja California where Jaime finds and takes him to an Indian healer. The two quickly become friends and encounter Father Serra on his way to carry out the orders of the king to expand the Spanish empire into Upper California. Both are in awe of the little man's determination to carry The Word of God to the natives and how he ignores the severe wounds in his leg, limping through an unknown land amidst hordes of naked savages. Viewing Father Serra's faith and piety, the two willingly help, understanding how the friar from far away Majorca does everything possible to care for the Indians as a father cares for his children.

The Sailor and The Carpenter takes the reader through the journey in desolate Baja California to the shores of San Miguel Bay, the future site of Mission San Diego de Alcal?.

The King;s Highway takes the reader through the founding of the first 9 mission until Father Serra's death. The Missions Bloom takes the reader through the founding of the remaining of the 21 missions, Mexico's independence from Spain and the arrival of American settlers. Throughout all, one is introduced to the extraordinary faith and piety of the friars and their unending desire to bring the child-like Indians to The Church.

http://www.bluewoodpublishing.com/Bo...Carpenter.html

http://www.bluewoodpublishing.com/Bo...gsHighway.html

http://www.bluewoodpublishing.com/Au...A-DaleDay.html
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Old 02-19-2012, 10:13 AM  
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In conducting research for my Father Serra's Legacy novels, I came across yet another interesting and informative book:

The Old Franciscan Missions Of California


Author: George Wharton James

This was written in the early 1900's close enough to have many first-hand
accounts of the missions, the friars and the Indians who lived there.

This is available free as a download from The Gutenberg Project.
[EBook #13854]
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