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Old 04-15-2011, 01:51 PM  
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Rehoboth Beach, DE
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fire alarm siren. do we need it?

I live in downtown Rehoboth Beach. When fire alarm at the fire station blares it's announcement that there is an emergency, I have to close the windows, it's so loud. This happens at all hours of the night and throughout the day. With todays technology, do we need this thing anymore?
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Old 04-15-2011, 02:56 PM  
mohel
 
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Depends what purposes they feel are served by it. I'd think a beeper and a flashing light on the fire house should be adequate but I'm not a fireman.
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Old 05-12-2011, 04:06 PM  
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where i live, there are several large horns throughout town. ive never heard them and i assume they are for weather emergencies and such. but i can only imagine how loud they are...

when i lived in Pennsylvania, we had them too. SUPER loud.
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Old 06-19-2011, 07:50 PM  
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DE, DE
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Yes - As a fellow DE resident in the area, there are large portions where members live that still do not have complete beeper coverage.

With as many wooden structures you have in the area right around you, it would be in your best interest to get as many firefighters as possible right to you as quickly as possible.
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Old 07-05-2011, 11:23 PM  
mohel
 
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Quote:
As a fellow DE resident in the area,
Sorry, on first reading I missed the location and for the Atlantic seaboard that could be crucial.

Scientists Warn Of Massive
Tidal Wave From
Canary Island Volcano


Quote:
A wave higher than Nelson's Column and travelling faster than a jet aircraft will devastate the eastern seaboard of America and inundate much of southern Britain, say scientists who have analysed the effects of a future volcanic eruption in the Canary Islands.

A massive slab of rock twice the volume of the Isle of Man would break away from the island of La Palma and smash into the Atlantic Ocean to cause a tsunami - a monster wave - bigger than any recorded, the scientists warned yesterday.

Most of the wave's energy, equivalent to the combined output of America's power stations for six months, would travel westwards to the American coast but enough would be flicked north towards the English Channel to cause catastrophic coastal damage.

A computer model has been designed to show the way the tsunami will build after the volcano, called Cumbre Vieja, erupts on La Palma, at the western end of the Spanish island chain. It describes the almost unimaginable scale of an event that the scientists say could happen at any time within the foreseeable future.

"We're looking at an event that could be decades or a century away - but there will be a degree of warning beforehand," said Simon Day, of the Benfield Greg Hazard Reseach Centre at Univeristy College London.

Most of the rocky western flank of Cumbre Vieja is unstable enough to be dislodged in the next big eruption of the volcano, which is active enough to explode at least once or twice a century. Its last big event was in 1949.

Such a landslide from a future eruption could travel up to 60 kilometres (37 miles) from La Palma's coast, causing the formation and then collapse of a dome of water 900 metres (3,000ft) high and tens of kilometres wide. The bow of this collapsing dome of water would become a giant wave, but also, as the landslide continued to move underwater, a series of crests and troughs would soon generate the "wave train" of the tsunami.

With the leading wave in front and crests pushing it on behind, it would sustain the power for the nine-hour journey to the American east coast.

Tsunami means harbour wave in Japanese and, though the occurrence has nothing to do with the tides, it is often called a tidal wave in English. Throughout history they have caused widespread devastation, with Britain last being affected by one in 1755 when an earthquake in Lisbon caused an unusually large wave to hit southern ports.

The computer model, compiled in collaboration with Steven Ward of the University of California, Santa Cruz, predicts that the tsunami will have a height of 100 metres (330ft) from crest to trough when it crashes into the shores of nearby north-west Africa. By the time it reached its final destination, the east coast of Florida and the Caribbean islands, the tsunami would still be up to 50 metres high.

Low-lying land in Florida would be vulnerable to a sea wave that would inundate the mainland for several kilometres inland. Everything in its path would be flattened, the computer model predicted.

Even though the wave would be much smaller when it reached Britain, it would still breach sea defences because it would be larger than the biggest storm waves for which they were designed, Dr Day said. "For low-lying land along the south coast it could penetrate up to a mile," he said.

Although there is little doubt that the landslide on La Palma will happen after a volcanic eruption, the difficulty is knowing exactly when it will occur. "Eruptions of Cumbre Vieja occur at intervals of decades to a century or so and there may be a number of eruptions before its collapse," Dr Day said. "Although the year-to-year probability of a collapse is therefore low, the resulting tsunami would be a major disaster with indirect effects around the world."

The scientists are calling for better warning instruments to be placed on La Palma so that an impending eruption can be detected quickly enough to alert other areas that might be affected by a tsunami.

"Cumbre Vieja needs to be monitored closely for any signs of impending volcanic activity and for the deformation that would precede collapse. The collapse will occur during some future eruption after days or weeks of precursory deformation and earthquakes," Dr Day predicted.

"An effective earthquake monitoring system could provide advanced warning of a likely collapse and allow early emergency management organisations a valuable window of time in which to plan and respond," he said.
Quote:
Dr Russell Wynn said, "The Canary Islands are volcanic islands that collapse at regular intervals in geological time. However, it is important to remember that in the last 200,000 years there have only been two major landslides on the flanks of the Canary Islands. At SOC we have studied previous Canary Islands landslides to understand how they move, and have found good evidence to show that the landslides actually break up and fall into the sea in several stages."
"By analogy, if you drop a brick into a bath you get a big splash, but if you break that brick up into several pieces and drop them in one by one, you get several small splashes. Therefore a multi-stage failure would certainly not generate tsunamis capable of damaging the coastlines of southern England or the American east coast, although they may have an impact on nearby Canary Islands."
Dr Wynn added, "The mega-tsunami scenario currently being aired in the media is a hypothetical 'worst case', and is largely based upon speculative computer models of landslide motion and tsunami generation. In contrast, our work involves study of actual landslide deposits."
HTML Code:
http://www.rense.com/general13/tidal.htm
Quote:
Canary Islands

Geologists S. Day and S. Ward consider that a megatsunami could be generated during a future eruption involving the Cumbre Vieja on the volcanic ocean island of La Palma, in the Canary Islands.[13][14]

In 1949, the Cumbre Vieja volcano erupted at its Duraznero, Hoyo Negro and San Juan vents. During this eruption, an earthquake with an epicentre near the village of Jedy occurred. The following day Rubio Bonelli, a local geologist, visited the summit area and discovered that a fissure about 2.5 kilometers (1.6 mi) long had opened on the eastern side of the summit. As a result, the western half of the Cumbre Vieja (which is the volcanically active arm of a triple-armed rift) had slipped about 2 meters (6.6 ft) downwards and 1 meter (3.3 ft) westwards towards the Atlantic Ocean[citation needed].

The Cumbre Vieja volcano is currently in a dormant stage, but will almost certainly erupt again in the future. Day and Ward hypothesize[13][14] that if such an eruption causes the western flank to fail, a megatsunami will be generated.
HTML Code:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megatsunami
And you were worried about a siren........
fire alarm siren. do we need it?-tsulapalmareliefmap.gif 

fire alarm siren. do we need it?-lapalma1.jpg 

fire alarm siren. do we need it?-palma2.jpg 

fire alarm siren. do we need it?-cvt.jpg 

fire alarm siren. do we need it?-70007.jpg 

fire alarm siren. do we need it?-93678.jpg 



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Old 07-24-2011, 10:05 AM  
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Wow blucher thats a good report!(as always) hope it never happens.:-)
As for the sirens , we have them here in Port st Lucie as well. It is a once a month test and we call them" iTS GOD SPEAKING" there are speakers on the streets anouncing "this is a test. " We have a nuclear power station on the beach, A1A .
So the warnings are neccesary. We live with it.
But you sure put things in a perspective.
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Old 07-25-2011, 11:38 AM  
mohel
 
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Quote:
It is a once a month test and we call them" iTS GOD SPEAKING" there are speakers on the streets anouncing "this is a test. " We have a nuclear power station on the beach, A1A .
So the warnings are neccesary. We live with it.
After TMI I'd be happy to live with it.

I use TV as background noise much of the time but the evening I heard someone say "East Coast tsunami" it got my attention.

It will happen but few are aware of the danger nor are they prepared for evacuation. Twill be a clusterfark.
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Old 07-26-2011, 02:55 PM  
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We are prepared for huriccane evacuations,and even that doesnt prove to go smoothly.
Most of the people would not even believe that it could affect us, even if being warned in time,(just like in the advancing hurricane) so they wont budge ,there be also those that dont have the means to escape and the gov does not have the capabilities to evacuate such a huge numbers of people.
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Old 07-26-2011, 03:56 PM  
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I live 1/8 of a mile away from Davis-Monthan AFB. Have for 22 years. I am used to loud noises.
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This definitely rates about a 9.0 on my weird-sh*t-o-meter.
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