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Old 06-14-2011, 08:46 AM  
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Houston, Texas
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As a geologist, who worked in a water rock interaction lab, you need to know a few things. One, the steam or hot water needs to be used close to the source, it has a tendency to cool down. Energy producing turbines are the norm near geothermal sources if the sustained pressure is high enough, which is normaly is not. Think Old Faithful. Ground water needs to percolate down, and be heated in order to produce steam, it tends to do so in fits and starts. Geothermal steam is highly corrosive and necessitates the use of stainless steel or other expensive alloys. Scale build up is another problem. Think hot water heater. Scale can not only be limestone but other types of rock if the water bearing the minerals comes from greater depths.

The Icelanders can use geothermal to heat their homes because they are in essence, sitting on it. Trying to pipe "geothermal" heat any distance is inpractical for the above stated reasons which all boil down to cost. It will be a long time before fossil fuels are replaced due to their abundance and inexpensiveness.
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Old 06-14-2011, 08:57 AM  
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Duncan, Oklahoma, (formerly So, California)
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Originally Posted by neckbone View Post
Man, from seeing the other posts, SCE&G is raping us here in Columbia, SC. Last month, our power bill was $225. 20 of that was gas, the other was electricity. I've got a brick veneer house about 1900 sq ft running a heat pump.

Water seems to be consistantly around $65/month for two baths plus dishwasher and washing machine. Of course we have two kids, so we wash a crapload of clothes each week.
I had SCE&G in California,,,,"Southern California Electric & Gas"..
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:14 AM  
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Duncan, Oklahoma, (formerly So, California)
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Originally Posted by RedJeepXJ View Post
for a proper study you really need fair comparables such as similar square footage and similar year of construction, and fuel source. Otherwise you will get a lot of data that will be hard to generate any conclusions from, especially with the relatively low number of responses you will likely get from each area.
Sq, Ft. wouldn't necessarily change the "ratings".
Ratings may change with "property zone"(?) (commercial-residential).
Then again, this may be different per state.
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:19 AM  
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Valencia, California
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Valencia California
May usage: 1003kw billed @ $151.87. My rate is somewhat lowered because I particate in a program with a remote meter installed that allows rolling blackouts if required during peak demand times.
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:28 AM  
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I didn't read through all 15 pages, so sorry if this is a repost.

Texas rates are all posted online here....
Power to Choose: Compare Offers Now
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:43 AM  
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Sugar Land, TX
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Houston - 2800 square ft. first summer electric bill $260 (gas water heater, gas cooking, everything else electric including pool pump) My kilowatt rate is 8.6 cents. Water bill was $60.
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Old 06-14-2011, 09:59 AM  
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Keizer, OR
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Originally Posted by KPatton View Post
As a geologist, who worked in a water rock interaction lab, you need to know a few things. One, the steam or hot water needs to be used close to the source, it has a tendency to cool down.
I'd wondered about insulated pipe being a deal breaker although the distance at least to Eugene is small.

Quote:
Energy producing turbines are the norm near geothermal sources if the sustained pressure is high enough, which is normaly is not. Think Old Faithful. Ground water needs to percolate down, and be heated in order to produce steam, it tends to do so in fits and starts. Geothermal steam is highly corrosive and necessitates the use of stainless steel or other expensive alloys. Scale build up is another problem. Think hot water heater. Scale can not only be limestone but other types of rock if the water bearing the minerals comes from greater depths.
Not far North of Eugene the water has plenty of magnesium.

Quote:
The Icelanders can use geothermal to heat their homes because they are in essence, sitting on it. Trying to pipe "geothermal" heat any distance is inpractical for the above stated reasons which all boil down to cost. It will be a long time before fossil fuels are replaced due to their abundance and inexpensiveness.
The up front costs would indicate that but cleaning up such a large carbon footprint should be considered part of it's cost.

Thanks for adding an expert's insights. There are many energy sources but far fewer options that can compete in the market. I still believe something like wave energy might give us a breakthough. I think it's Oregon State University that is running experiments using buoy-like devices moving like a piston.

Transmission is another stick wicket but our cities were located based on trade. Is it unreasonable to consider relocation of people to areas near cheap energy? The Bay of Fundy looks like a terrific place for an Energy Lab.
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Old 06-14-2011, 11:27 AM  
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Bellingham, Washington
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I recently moved, I have yet to recieve my new utility bill..... Otherwise I'd help you out.
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Old 06-14-2011, 12:12 PM  
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Rochester, New York
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utility bills

Rochester NY area (Upstate NY)

1900 sq ft
electric: 35.00
Gas: 100.00
Rounded off...
Have:
gas stove, gas furnace (not currently in use as of the last bill), electric dryer, no a/c on now.

Good luck with the project!
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Old 06-14-2011, 01:09 PM  
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1800 square foot 2 story house in Greenacres florida last months electric bill was $275 and water was $42. and thats 4 adults. Also need to add I have a cheast freezer for making beer. so there is extra cost on the electric.
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