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Old 06-14-2011, 12:16 PM  
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I would also consider the Husqvarna, but I hear they are very costly!
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Old 06-14-2011, 01:05 PM  
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I was tempted to price the one with the automatic tensioner but I really don't need a chainsaw right now.
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Old 06-14-2011, 01:17 PM  
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Can't go wrong with Husqvarna, but you have to balance purchase price against anticipated useage.

If you're cutting your own fire wood every year or clearing a big piece of land, I'd say go for it, but if it's just for occasional use there are pretty good less pricey saws out there that will give you years of use if you learn how to use it properly and carry out regular maintenance.
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Old 06-14-2011, 03:12 PM  
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Originally Posted by RiponredTJ View Post
Can't go wrong with Husqvarna, but you have to balance purchase price against anticipated useage.

If you're cutting your own fire wood every year or clearing a big piece of land, I'd say go for it, but if it's just for occasional use there are pretty good less pricey saws out there that will give you years of use if you learn how to use it properly and carry out regular maintenance.
That's what I'm debating. I know there's still more work to be done, but I'm not sure how much longer it's going to take. I would like one in case I need one, and I don't want to borrow it.
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Old 06-14-2011, 10:59 PM  
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Chainsaws are like trucks. Or winches. Or trailers. Or heavy-duty drain snakes. Or...

When you have them, you find reasons to use them. And when people find out you have them, they ask you to use them, usually with beer and pizza in compensation.
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Old 06-15-2011, 10:21 AM  
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I would like one in case I need one, and I don't want to borrow it.
Hate borrowing. My neighbors talked me into using their car for groceries. I drove one block and began a left only to discover the steering wheel had broken off from the column. they laughed but I did not.
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Old 06-15-2011, 12:07 PM  
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I have a Husky and a Stihl, and either will last you the rest of your life, given that you are just using it around the place. Both my saws have cut hundreds and I mean hundreds of cords of wood, and still scream! You could easily get by with a Jonsored or like brand too. Very well built saws. Should I post a shot of my saws?
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Old 06-15-2011, 01:51 PM  
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Hate borrowing. My neighbors talked me into using their car for groceries. I drove one block and began a left only to discover the steering wheel had broken off from the column. they laughed but I did not.
What kind of car?

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I have a Husky and a Stihl, and either will last you the rest of your life, given that you are just using it around the place. Both my saws have cut hundreds and I mean hundreds of cords of wood, and still scream! You could easily get by with a Jonsored or like brand too. Very well built saws. Should I post a shot of my saws?
I would like that.

Anyone have a size the prefer? I'm not cutting down trees so much as cleaning brush.
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Old 06-16-2011, 05:50 PM  
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What kind of car?



I would like that.

Anyone have a size the prefer? I'm not cutting down trees so much as cleaning brush.
For blade length, 12-14" is plenty for brush work, and will work for bigger logs in a pinch. You can cut up to 24" diameter logs with a 12" saw if that's all you've got to work with. Smaller blades are much easier to control than larger.

For motor size, it really depends. If you'll *ever* want to cut heavier logs, I'd suggest something close to 50cc. If you'll primarily be cutting stuff up to 6" diameter and nothing over 12", a 30cc saw will be lighter and easier to control. We use 30cc Stihls when we're climbing, in a bucket, or otherwise need a saw we can control one-handed if necessary. I'd call it underpowered for anything over 4" diameter logs, but one-handed controllability is the important part.

Around here a 50cc motor with a 14-16" blade is a good utilitarian saw. But, we have to cut 12"-20" diameter logs pretty regularly. For the use you've described, a 35cc-45cc motor pulling a 12-14" blade would be fine.

IMO, if you're on the fence between two models, the one with the shorter blade or the bigger motor is the more desirable one.
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Old 06-17-2011, 12:07 PM  
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What kind of car?



I would like that.

Anyone have a size the prefer? I'm not cutting down trees so much as cleaning brush.
If you are clearing brush, then you should consider a brush whacker. If you are cutting brush as in bushes and the like, you'll be throwing chains. You can cut some larger trees down with certain blades on a brush whacker. Ours will cut up to 6 inch trees believe it or not. Lot less bending over too! If you are doing a lot of limbing, then a 20 inch bar is where you need to be looking. My Husky saw has a 24 inch and that in my opinion is perfect for limbing, but the saw is heavy because of the size. My Stihl has I believe a 14 inch, and something that small, is great if you are climbing up into the tree for limbing as Rival mentions.
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