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Old 08-15-2011, 03:06 PM  
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Is Rick Perry as Christian as He Thinks He Is?

Is Rick Perry as Christian as He Thinks He Is? - Kathleen Kennedy Townsend - Politics - The Atlantic

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The Texas governor is running an openly religious campaign, but does he overlook the parts of the Bible that do not support his political beliefs?

America is a religious nation. Polls may differ, but most find that over 80 percent of Americans say they believe in God. Fifty percent also say they go to church on Sunday, while only half of those actually do. I guess this shows that we want to look better than we actually are, at least to the public -- if not to God, who presumably knows what we're really up to.

Most political candidates also profess their belief in God. At the same time, they rarely make a big deal of their devotion. They've probably read Matthew 6:1, which warns, "Beware of practicing your piety before men in order to be seen by them."

Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who just announced he's running for president, has taken a different tack. A week before announcing his candidacy, he led a prayer meeting for evangelical Christians in Houston. The Freedom From Religion Foundation filed a lawsuit trying to stop him from participating in this rally, arguing that he was violating the First Amendment by using his position, stationery, and website to promote the event. The court dismissed the complaint, saying that the plaintiff didn't show sufficient harm to merit the injunction.

I disagree with the court's ruling. I think the governor misused his office to promote a particular religion. That might have been clearer to the judge if Perry had organized a rally in support of Islam rather than Christianity. There's no difference as far as the First Amendment is concerned.

In any case, Gov. Perry's decision to make his Christian faith a central part of his political identity opens him up to questions not usually asked of presidential candidates.

The press has traditionally been unwilling to question politicians about their religion. But in Perry's case, Christianity is front and center on his platform. I hope David Gregory will ask him some of the following questions when he next appears on Meet the Press, and that other members of the media won't shy away from them either.

First, are Rick Perry's political positions in line with Christ's teachings?

I see a fundamental inconsistency between Perry's concerted opposition to government social programs and his promotion of himself as a Christian politician. When asked about the impact of Texas's low-tax, low-service policies on the poor, he suggested that people who wanted more government services could find them in New York or California.

Christ teaches us to feed the hungry and care for the sick, not to abandon them. Perhaps Gov. Perry hasn't read that part of the Bible where Christ admonishes us to care for "the least among us."

It's more likely that he knows that passage but reads it in a particular light. When I wrote Failing America's Faithful, I interviewed Rick Warren, the evangelical Christian minister and author, about his bestselling book, The Purpose Driven Life. Rick very kindly welcomed me to Saddleback, the church he had founded more than 30 years before. He and his wife were gracious to me. I was impressed by the thoughtfulness with which he reached out to his congregation, and his sensitivity to their needs and wants.

I had read his book, and coming from a different Christian tradition, I was struck by how much it focused on getting you to feel good about yourself rather than caring about your neighbor, which Christ had said was the greatest commandment.

Warren, who now runs many charitable programs and supports government efforts to help the poor and the sick, was forthright in explaining that his views had changed since writing the book. The evangelical church he had grown up in, he told me, had focused on the believer's personal relationship to Jesus and pretty much ignored the social side of the gospel. He finally realized that he had "missed the 2,500 passages" in the Bible that called on him to care about other people, including those outside his church.

Does Rick Perry acknowledge those 2,500 passages? That's the second question I'd like the press to ask him. Maybe he believes, like some socially conservative evangelicals, that these passages refer only to personal charity, not government programs. But I don't see any place in the Bible that says we shouldn't use all the tools we have at hand to help the poor, the sick, and the hungry.

The same conservative Christians claim that the Bible teaches them that the government should outlaw gay marriage and stem cell research. But why should the government carry out some Biblical injunctions and not others?

The Bible is certainly open to interpretation. For example, most churches in America today don't require us to gouge out our eyes if we look lustfully at someone, or to cut off our hand if we use it a sinful way. And yet, right there in Matthew 5:27-30 are clear instructions.

How does Gov. Perry interpret the Bible? Even more to the point, I'd like to hear him explain how he arrived at his interpretations. If you're running for president in a democratic country, it's not enough to proclaim that the Bible says something is right or wrong. You must have reasoned positions. Catholics have been taught to inquire into God's will by using our reason, examining nature, and listening to Church teaching -- as well as by interpreting the Bible.

A last question for the governor: does he believe that God agrees with his reading of the Bible? I'm not saying he does believe this; I'm just wondering.

An alternative to assuming our views are aligned with God's is to humbly acknowledge that God works in mysterious ways, and that our human nature may blind us to His will. In that case, our belief in God could lead us to question the infallibility of our own interpretations rather than making us proud. Pride, at least in the Catholic catechism, is one of the seven deadly sins.

No one has a monopoly on faith. In a democratic nation, simply saying you believe in Christ doesn't mean you get a free pass and don't have to explain your positions. The story of the Good Samaritan reminds us that it is our actions, not our public displays of piety, that make us good neighbors.


The Texas Unmiracle
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/15/op...unmiracle.html

Quote:
As expected, Rick Perry, the governor of Texas, has announced that he is running for president. And we already know what his campaign will be about: faith in miracles.

Some of these miracles will involve things that you?re liable to read in the Bible. But if he wins the Republican nomination, his campaign will probably center on a more secular theme: the alleged economic miracle in Texas, which, it?s often asserted, sailed through the Great Recession almost unscathed thanks to conservative economic policies. And Mr. Perry will claim that he can restore prosperity to America by applying the same policies at a national level.

So what you need to know is that the Texas miracle is a myth, and more broadly that Texan experience offers no useful lessons on how to restore national full employment.

It?s true that Texas entered recession a bit later than the rest of America, mainly because the state?s still energy-heavy economy was buoyed by high oil prices through the first half of 2008. Also, Texas was spared the worst of the housing crisis, partly because it turns out to have surprisingly strict regulation of mortgage lending.

Despite all that, however, from mid-2008 onward unemployment soared in Texas, just as it did almost everywhere else.
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Old 08-16-2011, 12:24 AM  
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The KJV does have trouble with Hebrew idioms, the AENT does a much better job.
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Old 08-16-2011, 04:43 PM  
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I don't want to 'go there' again.

Yet, it seems we will go 'there' again.

I've done my time in trying to gain insight and won't do that again.
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Old 08-16-2011, 05:50 PM  
mohel
 
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Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
The KJV does have trouble with Hebrew idioms, the AENT does a much better job.
KJV?

Koch Jumentum Vermis?
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Old 08-17-2011, 12:13 AM  
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It's funny that the democrats' poster boy of late was a womanizing pervert but Christians are for bashing. Oh well, a sign of the times.
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Old 08-17-2011, 07:41 AM  
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What about race--that was popular a decade ago.
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Old 08-17-2011, 10:40 AM  
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Cartoons seem to be popular with some, they waste a lot of bandwidth though.
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Old 08-17-2011, 01:14 PM  
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Originally Posted by Eddie_T View Post
Cartoons seem to be popular with some, they waste a lot of bandwidth though.
A lot of money will be wasted. Good to know about the 'bundlers'---apparently individuals who know other individuals with massive amounts of money to fill the campaign coffers. Think of the millions and billions---touring the country, getting the messages out. The shaking of hands and kissing of babies.

The frying pan or the fire. I voted 2x for Bush--I wasn't absolutely convinced about the economic plans, the corporations and a few other things. I still have those same reservations.
All we need is 1 of them. Let's pick 1 now.
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Old 08-17-2011, 06:23 PM  
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I don't think there really are any "real" christians left. When comparing what is claimed that jesus actually did in how he treated people and how most christians act, I don't see much resemblence.

The hard core right wing christians would absolutely label Jesus as being a Communist
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Old 08-17-2011, 06:53 PM  
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