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Old 03-02-2011, 07:27 PM  
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Amarillo, Texas
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Feeding the dog

How long are you to wait before/after walking a dog to feed them?
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:24 PM  
Pass. seat of a streetcar
 
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Amarillo, Texas
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Anyone? Some say at least an hour.
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:29 PM  
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What? There is a rule for that?
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:29 PM  
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this forum is slow with replies.... My dog wants to go out back to have a bowel movement mid meal, then comes back in and finishes breakfast, and then I'll take him for a walk. I'm guessing it is an individual experience but I've heard 45 minutes which obviously my dog can't wait. I feed him diner too and a walk follows immediately after that but usually he just pees on everything.
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Old 03-04-2011, 12:25 PM  
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Ashdown, Arkansas
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That depends, if it's just a casual, easy walk then I don't see a need to wait but, after play, running, agility or any fairly intense exercise, I wait for the dog to stop panting before offering water, then 30 minutes after that to feed. Same goes the other way around, I wait 30 minutes after feeding to do anything vigorous with the dog. (Okay if dog choese to do something, as especially puppies usually do)
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Old 03-31-2011, 07:08 PM  
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I feed my dog twice a day. Morning & night. He eats a lot at night but real light breakfasts. I go walking him sometimes right after, sometimes a few minutes but he just loves to go. We go out for awhile, and go a miminum of 5 miles. I usually cut him loose from the leash to do his poo bout quarter mile out. My answer is what ever is comfortable for you and your dog, don't stress over rules, I don't. I don't walk him at night, he has a dog door, too many rattlesnakes for that after dark crap.
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Old 03-31-2011, 08:20 PM  
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As a former K-9 handler, we would usually allow the dog to digest for about an hour before any exercising because of a concern over "bloat."

Bloat occurs when something goes wrong during digestion of food. Something causes gases to build up in the stomach so fast, that the stomach blows up like a balloon, stretching the organ so much that normal circulation of blood to and from the heart is cutoff. The stretching itself and the lack of blood to the stomach?s cells can cause cell death, or necrosis. What makes it even worse and more immediately serious is when the stomach actually ?twists and turns? (known as Volvulus) at the top near the esophagus and at the bottom of the stomach at the pyloric valve. Picture a tootsie roll candy that?s got a wrapper twisted at both ends keeping the candy lodged inside the paper.

That is exactly what happens to the stomach during bloat with volvulus. Gas is trapped and can?t escape as a burp or the other end as ?passing gas?. The gas builds and builds as it becomes trapped within the stomach. The stomach grows so large it cuts-off circulation, as mentioned above and irreversible damage is done to the cells. The dog goes into shock and then cardiac arrest. This can happen within several hours after the start of bloat. That is why if you suspect your dog is experiencing this problem, you must RUSH THE DOG IMMEDIATELY, to the vet or animal hospital.

A few examples of what scientists believe to be contributing factors to the causes of bloat are listed below:

1. Large meals eaten at one time. They recommend serving your dog two smaller meals a day, rather than just one big one.

2. Rigorous exercise done either right before a meal or right after one. You should wait one hour before feeding after exercise and one hour after eating before you let your dog run around.

3. Dry food given that is high in grain, which causes fermentation during digestion which causes gas. Dry food should have meat, meat meal and bone meal listed within the first few ingredients, not grain. In other words, dry food should have more meat than grain in it?s ingredients. [some texts claim this is not true, but most do agree with it.]

4. If only dry food is given, some people moisten it with water if it is a high end dog food. However, with lesser quality foods, less meat-based dog food, the ones that are mostly grains, it is better to NOT wet the food, since water mixed with grain will start fermentation, a process that has by-products of gas. But if the food is mostly meat, it's ok, and can actually help with digestion.

5. Mix dry food with canned food if possible.

6. Gulping large amounts of water at one time during meals. Keep water within the dogs reach at all times, except during meals.

7. Be careful of snacks and biscuits that are high in carbohydrates. Grains are carbohydrates.

8. Avoid dog food high in citric acid used as a preservative or high in fat.

Signs and Symptoms:

Know your dog. Most of the symptoms are behavioral, at least in the very beginning, so your dog will start to act differently. The abdomen is stretched to many times its normal size due to an increase of gas. It will blow up like a balloon and is one of the first most obvious signs. In some cases, this part of the bloat event, can?t been seen. But, usually you can see the distended abdomen which will also feel very hard to the touch, like a ball that has been pumped-up with too much air.

This event causes SEVERE abdominal pain. So, you may see that your dog is acting uncomfortable, pacing the floor, not being about to find a comfortable position to lie down or may make sounds like he is in pain.

The biggest, most obvious symptom is the that the dog appears to be nauseated. He will unsuccessfully attempt to vomit and will retch and gag, but nothing comes up, or very little if any. He will also attempt to have a bowel movement, assume the position, but again, nothing comes out. Excessive drooling is also a common symptom.

IF ANY OF THESE THINGS HAPPEN, CALL YOUR VETERINARIAN OR RUSH YOUR DOG TO THE NEAREST ANIMAL HOSPITAL. It is better to be safe than sorry. As mentioned earlier, there are only a few hours available to handle this problem, so time is everything in a case of bloat. Your vet will put everything else aside to address your dog?s condition.

Other Factors which Increase Risk of Bloat:

1. Dog?s Breed - Large breed dogs are most susceptible, although on occasion, small dogs may bloat too.

2. Dog?s that are ?deep-chested?. This means the length of the chest from backbone to sternum is long and the width of the chest is more narrow.

3. Dog?s that have ancestor-history of bloating. It?s thought to be hereditary.

4. Underweight, or thin dogs.

5. Anxious or fearful temperament. These dogs should always eat in an environment made as peaceful as possible for them.

6. Aggressive dogs. #?s five and six indicate that ?nerves? or emotions can play a role in triggering a bloat episode.

7. Males dogs get it more than female.

8. Older dogs are more at risk than young. (older than 7 yrs.)
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Old 04-01-2011, 09:50 AM  
fustrated genius
 
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Havasu, I have been around dogs all my life. I hunted with tree hounds for years. I had heard of bloating certainly but thought of it happening because of the dry dog food swelling as the dog gulps too much water after eating. Thanks for that post, it brings new light and I will certainly discuss this with my vet when I take my dog in Monday for his annual, boosters and neutering appointment. I think my personal emphesis of concern in my area is still snakes, heat, snakes, HEAT and there's been reports rabies in the news, but none the less, thanks, it's definately warrents attention.
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Old 04-01-2011, 04:49 PM  
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Some dogs are more prone to bloat...usually ones with a long body. I have a friend with a show Weimaraner and was allowing the dog to jump for sticks. It developed bloat and died before he got it to the animal hospital. It is a very painful death for all involved. Just something to watch for, and this was why I posted it.
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Old 04-07-2011, 07:40 AM  
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Syracuse, NY
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They also recommend making your dog bend down to get the food, keeping the bowl on the floor. It reduces the air and gas and makes the food go in properly. If they are standing with their head up there is also increase chances or bloat.
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