Go Back   CityProfile.com Forum - Local City and State Discussion Forums > United States City Forums > Texas
Click Here to Login

Reply
Old 04-27-2011, 06:25 PM  
Member
 
GeoBigJon's Avatar

San Angelo, Texas
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 49 | Kudos: +10
Found this in our local online paper, current as of today and list fires in Texas and their status.

gosanangelo.com
__________________

Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 02:22 PM  
Moderator Emeritus
 
Austin's Avatar

Texas
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,990 | Kudos: +90
Images: 8
Wow it's worse than I thought.
__________________

Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 02:34 PM  
What page are you on?
 
Britney's Avatar

in a van... down by the river, Texas
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 687 | Kudos: +34
Images: 1
i saw on the news, a cattle rancher has lost hundreds of acres and several cows. :[

his neighbors are bringing hay and water.
Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 02:38 PM  
mohel
 
blucher's Avatar

Keizer, OR
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 4,383 | Kudos: +123
Images: 99
10 characters
Fire in Texas-decban-1-copy.jpg 

__________________
I'll believe corporations are persons when Texas executes one.: LBJ's Ghost
Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 04:34 PM  
Moderator Emeritus
 
Austin's Avatar

Texas
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,990 | Kudos: +90
Images: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by blucher View Post
10 characters
Thanks for the graph.

I have to take my burn pile quite a ways.
Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 06:41 PM  
Member
 
GeoBigJon's Avatar

San Angelo, Texas
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 49 | Kudos: +10
Many communities are banning all outside burning, charcoal and wood BBQ's. Gas grills are ok at this time. San Angelo is one of them.
Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 06:51 PM  
mohel
 
blucher's Avatar

Keizer, OR
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 4,383 | Kudos: +123
Images: 99
Jon, if there is all that dry scrub brush in April couldn't controlled burns help prevent this reoccurring? About all of Texas I've seen outside a football stadium looked very dry.
There's a lot of energy in all that brush, might be convertable into electricity.
__________________
I'll believe corporations are persons when Texas executes one.: LBJ's Ghost
Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2011, 09:08 PM  
Member
 
GeoBigJon's Avatar

San Angelo, Texas
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 49 | Kudos: +10
Yeah the brush has its potential. The Juniper is used for oil, they shred it and press it to collect the oil for cosmetics and other things. Then they use the fiber and combine it with plastic to make imitation boards that don't weather or rot. Its kind of a new product, and collection is very labor intensive. The Mesquite in the pasture is great for BBQ's. Some company is using Mesquite to make ethanol, not sure how that is going. As far as the rest of the stuff out there, control burns are a valuable tool, but most people can't or won't do them. They limit pasture usage for a year or two, which is good, but most ranchers can't afford not to use the land for grazing that long. Over grazing is a major issue out here, so lots of brush, little grass. There are some grasses that can be grown and harvested then used in power plants for fuel. The government does usually offer a brush control subsidy, they pay a portion of the cost to clear brush. Tractors and operators usually run about $95 an hour, fuel cost is killing most people out here. The subsidy usually only covers about 50% of the cost, ranching doesn't pay enough for much brush control. I personally do brush control, no government help, with tractors and chemical means on my ranches. I plan on attending a burn school this winter at the Texas A&M Experiment Station, where they teach burn schools and burning impacts on range land, pretty cool stuff. I don't know if that answers your question or I just got on a soap box and rambled. LOL
Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2011, 12:41 PM  
mohel
 
blucher's Avatar

Keizer, OR
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 4,383 | Kudos: +123
Images: 99
Quote:
I plan on attending a burn school this winter at the Texas A&M Experiment Station, where they teach burn schools and burning impacts on range land, pretty cool stuff. I don't know if that answers your question or I just got on a soap box and rambled. LOL
That's probably the most complete all encompassing answer I've received in any forum in 10 years. I thank you Sir and thank you also for your personal efforts on your ranches.

Reading over the fire locations I saw "pipeline" mentioned at least twice and wondered if it isn't in the interests of oil companies to subsidize some of this brush containment?

Here in Oregon I've heard the juniper is sucking parts of the land bone dry. Is that a problem for you too?
__________________
I'll believe corporations are persons when Texas executes one.: LBJ's Ghost
Reply With Quote
Old 04-29-2011, 01:53 PM  
Member
 
GeoBigJon's Avatar

San Angelo, Texas
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 49 | Kudos: +10
Quote:
Reading over the fire locations I saw "pipeline" mentioned at least twice and wondered if it isn't in the interests of oil companies to subsidize some of this brush containment?
Most pipelines and power lines are contracted to be cleared by an outside company. We have a transmission line that runs across our property that is cleared every few years. The bad about this is they clear the brush but do not kill the offending brush. Mesquite is one plant that either has to be dug up or treated chemically. Just cutting it off at the ground pisses it off, so I guess its job security for them to just come in and use a hydro axe to clear it out.

Quote:
Here in Oregon I've heard the juniper is sucking parts of the land bone dry. Is that a problem for you too?
Juniper here is a big problem, but not the biggest we have. We have two kinds of Juniper here, red and blue. Basically the same but they grow different and are killed in different ways. Blues can be cut off, taking all the green will kill it. Reds take poison, just cutting them off will not do it, they come back unless stump sprayed. Either can be grubbed with a tractor and if you get the root bowl then it will kill it too. I went to a brush control class a year ago and one of the Doctors speaking stated studies are showing juniper is not as much a water hog as once thought, that didn't get much acceptance from the seasoned ranchers who swear juniper is "the" water hog. More of an issue for use in West Texas is mesquite. This is a mother to get rid of and if you cleared it all out of your pasture you have a 10 year window before it will start to come back. It is spread from mesquite beans via birds or livestock. Mesquite sucks the moisture from the ground and has been shown to lower the water tables. Recent studies have shown water sources return when massive brush control is applied, pretty cool to see creeks flow again once the mesquite is removed. Our average rainfall is about 16 to 20 inches a year, so the more we do the more we get to keep.
__________________

__________________
Los Cuernos Ranch on Facebook
Reply With Quote
Reply

Go Back   CityProfile.com Forum - Local City and State Discussion Forums > United States City Forums > Texas
Bookmark this Page!

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


Suggested Threads

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.