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Old 09-26-2010, 03:09 PM  
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Calgary, Alberta
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New roof soon, what to look out for?

Hey There,
So Im getting a new shingle roof installed on the house and garage here pretty soon.

The old roof was a single layer of 25yr asphalt shingles and they didnt hold up too well. From what I've been able to read up on, it seems like the installation was done improperly in the valleys. They overlapped the shingles from one side of the roof to the other and whether there is metal flashing underneath or not, it isnt visible. On other roofs in the neighbourhood I see that the shingles have been cut away on the valley to expose the metal flashing to allow water a free path down to the gutter. Is this the proper way to do it?

It looks like on my valleys the rushing water has just stripped the shingles of all the grit and left them looking pretty terrible. It also appears it caused them to leak as the wood underneath is soggy and feels rotten. Not good.

So what are some things to look out for or to ask the next roofer that comes in? I live in a cold climate so Im going to make sure I Get atleast a couple rows of water and ice shield on the bottom of the roof, what else?

Oh, Im also looking at having a few more roof vents installed as the 2 I have are NOT sufficient for venting my attic area and it gets hot as heck in the house in the summer. Is there one style that is better than another? I've heard the turbine style can be noisy?

Thanks in advance.
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Old 09-26-2010, 10:02 PM  
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The overlapping technique that you describe in the valleys is pretty common here in California. I don't believe that it is well suited for your climate though.
Ice build-up can cause the water to flow horizontally under the shingles thus causing leaks. The exposed metal flashing in the valleys will allow the ice to slide off more easily thus preventing the dangerous build-up.
As for the ventilation; a very popular option is a ridge vent system that puts a built up mesh under the ridge shingles and provides highest point ventilation the full length of the house.
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Old 09-26-2010, 10:04 PM  
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Calgary, Alberta
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Thanks.

Are there any downsides to the ridge vent system? More of a chance of the peak being torn off in high winds?
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Old 09-26-2010, 11:07 PM  
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San Marcos, Texas
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Are metal roofs very common in Calgary?
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Old 09-27-2010, 02:55 AM  
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Los Angeles, California
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Originally Posted by Chris00WJ View Post
Thanks.

Are there any downsides to the ridge vent system? More of a chance of the peak being torn off in high winds?
They claim to be tested to 110 mph winds and they only hold the ridge shingles up about 1/2"
You need to keep in mind that air can only go out if there is good soffit ventilation or other lower source for air to get in.
Google and look at the G.A.F. Roofing or Elk Roofing site and they will explain all of the details and show the other options.
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Old 09-28-2010, 08:39 AM  
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Syracuse, NY
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I just had my roof replaced in may, I know you want them to put down this layer of weather thing at least 8 feet up if they are good. The vapor thing is really important in cold climates.

I got a white energy star shingle roof installed.
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Old 09-28-2010, 03:34 PM  
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Calgary, Alberta
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Metal roofing isnt popular for residential applications in Calgary yet, but its commonly used on commercial buildings. We tend to get a fair bit of hail (atleast 1-2 fairly bad storms per year) so a metal roof would get damaged within a year or two for sure.

Helicase50 I think the stuff you are talking about is the ice and water shield. The self-adhesive membrane that prevents water leakage from ice backing up under the shingles from the eavestrough. I'll definitely be having that installed.

JLCinLA I will definitely look into the ridge vent and talk to my roofing guy about the best options. Im pretty sure my soffit vents well but I honestly havent even been in my attic to look, haha.

Keep the ideas coming! Im making a list! Thanks.
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Old 09-28-2010, 04:43 PM  
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Syracuse, NY
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Originally Posted by Chris00WJ View Post

Helicase50 I think the stuff you are talking about is the ice and water shield. The self-adhesive membrane that prevents water leakage from ice backing up under the shingles from the eavestrough. I'll definitely be having that installed.
lol yeah, I just know it is suppose to go up 6-8 feet at least.

Oh don't forget clean up (nails) and if they protect your neighbors houses (not sure how close they are). Those can be costly.
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Old 09-28-2010, 06:04 PM  
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Titusville, Pennsylvania
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I recently did a roof job, including tearing down the old "hung" chimney. (new furnace,no chimney) I used architectural shingles, which when installed, make thee layers. Also added a ridge vent. (same here with the attic heat). You are correct about the valleys, if the flashing job is done well, the shingles should be cut back. Of course the pitch of the roof can make a difference on many installations.
Good luck.....
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Old 09-30-2010, 03:11 PM  
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Chris, I am a roofing contractor in Tennessee, the biggest reasons we see for premature roof failure is improper installation and improper ventilation.

Things to look for in a roofing contractor:

-are they licensed, bonded and insured? Don't take their word for it, ask for documentation and a certificate of ins. naming you as the insured.
-are their workers trained and certified?
-call the supply house where they buy material and ask for a referral there, ask if they are current on their account. You don't want your house leined because they skipped on paying the supplier.
-I wouldn't worry about asking for job referrals because even the worst roofer can supply 3 names of satisfied customers.
-do you homework and go to the MFG websites and educate yourself on the proper application specs of the shingles you are considering buying. Then see if the quotes you receive meet the MFG requirements. I know its a little work, but roofing is not a small ticket item, don't make the mistake of choosing the wrong installer or having them skip details that will void your MFG warranty.
-don't pay for the roof upfront. Let me say that again, don't pay for the roof till the job is complete and you are satisfied. PERIOD. If a installer can't handle out of pocket expenses for 3-4 days then you need to look for another installer, unless what you choose is a special ordered item, then a third of the contract price is acceptable. Be prepared to pay his invoice in full when the job is finished.

There is noting wrong with a closed valley application if ice and water shield in installed in the valleys.

Northern building codes require ice and water shield 3' past the interior wall of the house.

Ventilation is figured on a square foot of the attic area basis and there are formulas and charts that will detail each vent type requirement for intake(at the eaves) and exhaust (at the ridge line).

Each shingle has a nail line, most shingles require (4) nails per shingle on most roof installations and require them to be placed in the nail line, not in or above the adhesive strip.

My advise for anyone considering the purchase of a new roof is to not let price be the motivating factor on who installs your new roof, choose someone who is knowledgeable, reputable and presents the information in an understandable manner. Did they show up on time? Is their equipment in clean and decent shape? Are they more interested in helping you choose the perfect roof for you than getting your $$$ in their wallets?

Remember go to the MFG websites and become an informed consumer, I love when I go to a home and discuss with a homeowner that has taken the time to educate themselves, makes my job that much easier. GAF and Certainteed are great resources for homeowners to gain a little more knowledge about a big investment
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